The Kind Life is a community around Alicia Silverstone and The Kind Diet where friends, doctors, experts in green living, and members share vegan tips.

Green Life

Peace Silk: What Is It?

Last year, while I was shooting the film Gods Behaving Badly, we needed a wedding dress for one of the scenes in the movie. Eco-friendly, vegan designer Lucy Tammam created this beautiful dress pictured above. It is so pretty and romantic. Sadly, Lucy’s dress didn’t make it into the film, but I hope to go to her shop next time I’m in London.

A Conscious Couturier

Traditional silk is made from the cocoons of silkworms. The cocoons are harvested before the silkworms emerge from them, so silk manufacturers gas or steam the silkworms to kill them before collecting the cocoons. According to PETA, 3,000 silkworms are killed to make every pound of silk.

Lucy has found a kind, cruelty-free alternative. At her atelier in London, she creates handcrafted couture made from various vintage fabrics and consciously sourced materials. One of the fabrics she uses is called “Peace Silk.”

Peace silk is woven by hand by fair trade producers in India. This cruelty-free silk is sourced from the cocoons of the wild Eri moth. The process does not involve touching or harming the moths, nor does it require keeping them in captivity. Rather their cocoons are collected from the forest after the moths emerge and fly away.

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Give Peace Silk A Try

Lucy is offering a free cotton scarf to anyone who makes a purchase of £100 or more from Atelier Tammam. To receive your free scarf, note that you are a Kind Lifer in your payment details or email her to let her know that you found out about her through The Kind Life. She ships internationally and you can order online here, or if you live in London, visit her atelier at:

Atelier Tammam
5 Hastings Street
Bloomsbury
London
WC1H 9PZ
www.tammam.co.uk 

 

What do you think of Peace Silk?
Let’s dicuss in the comments below.

 

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10 Comments

  • njc January 21, 2014 at 1:20 pm

    I’m not sure about this issue. I know that studies have shown that plants know on some level when they are in danger. I don’t think that means that we’re not supposed to eat them.

    Reply

    • JD Mumma January 22, 2014 at 8:42 am

      njc – As a critical thinking skeptic*, I prefer to review the claim with the supportive evidence. I also prefer to not make claims I can not back up.
      Q1.) Are you able to provide the “studies” that you are referring to?
      Q2.) Have you investigated the study design and reviewed the study interpretation?
      Q3.) Have you looked at the the peer reviews or any of these studies?

      *sufficient evidence before acceptance or belief

      Reply

      • njc January 23, 2014 at 3:08 pm

        No, JD, in answer to 1, 2, 3. The things I have read are too far in the past to recall names, etc. May I say that I have believed in communication among species for many many years, and that my belief is backed up by life experience and wide associations with others, young and old, who also believe in their own experiences. When I was growing up I was taught that the human brain was the only thing that could be trusted, I had to fight that notion within myself in order to fully access a much broader sense of “what is”. I do appreciate your “critical thinking”, and sometimes need to be reminded of the need for it.

        Reply

  • Trish94903 January 21, 2014 at 2:44 pm

    This is so wonderful — I have always loved silk and was dismayed to find out that the silkworms are killed to make it. Haven’t bought anything made of silk since then. Now there is a kinder alternative that is also fair trade sourced. Thanks so much for this article–I’ve reposted it on my FB page for all of my friends.

    Reply

  • Donnaa Damzelle January 21, 2014 at 6:05 pm

    Until today i had no idea that these poor little moths were killed, and though my ignorance is no excuse, ive vowed that in the future mine will be peace silk. had it not been for care2 messages, i would not have known, for this i am grateful.
    I dont post on social sites any more, as i hate the spying of our accounts, but ive emailed many who are, and they will spread the word. so its Peace Silk from now on. THANK YOU so much

    Reply

  • BECOUNTEDK7 January 22, 2014 at 3:16 pm

    Likewise, I had no idea what these Sikworms went through to produce Silk.
    I will certainly never purchase any in the future and will inform people I know about this cruel practice.
    Thanks for posting.

    Reply

  • penny for your thoughts | sprinklesandtiaras January 22, 2014 at 7:48 pm

    […] you to check out other articles regarding silk and its humane alternative, peace silk. Click here and here for more […]

    Reply

  • Susan Jenkins January 23, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    How awful. I wish I had known sooner. I will no longer buy silk that isn’t Peace Silk.

    Reply

  • Vipérine Doc February 16, 2014 at 2:20 am

    Here is another point of view — this author says that peace silk may not be as “peaceful” as it’s marketed to be: http://www.wormspit.com/peacesilk.htm

    Reply

    • AlyssaMoh May 6, 2014 at 9:21 am

      yes, I also just read this in my research to find out whether or not it is truly ethical to wear silk.
      The short answer is really no if you look closely.

      Unfortunately, silk is another animal product that cannot be separated from cost to life.

      The next best thing would be some very finely spun cotton, or a similar cruelty-free synthetic.

      Maybe one day we will be able to bio-engineer silk, but to me, it is pretty clear that there is still a life cost involved through silk.

      Sad, I rather liked the fabric and own drapes made of it. To think of the cost involved for my luxury makes me feel bad :S

      Reply

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